rat trapping, beaver trapping, squirrel trapping, mole trapping, raccoon trapping, opossum trapping, animal control, animal removal, animal trapping, rat removal, beaver removal, squirrel removal, bat removal, bat trapping, guano removal, trapping companies, opossum removal, raccoon removal, how to get rid of rats, how to get rid of squirrels, how to remove moles from lawn/yard, how to get bats out of attic, noises in attic, beaver traps, feral cat traps, animal control companies

Raccoon

Oposssum

Skunk

Beavers

Feral Cats


Animals: Mammals & Predators


 

Facts:

Activity:
Nocturnal

Damage:
garbage, feces

Inhabits:
Attics, basements & crawl spaces

Cycle: Year round

Noises:
Nighttime

 

 

The Opossum

Opossum face up close trapped from attic in Ball Ground GA opossum removal in Ball Ground
Baby opossum removal Cumming ga Mother opossum control Cumming ga
 
opossum caught rummaging thru trash in milton ga  

Native to Central and South America, with one species extending N to the United States. With the exception of an obscure group found in South American forests, opossums are the only living marsupials outside the Australia–New Guinea region. Extremely abundant despite the encroachment of civilization and apparently little changed over millions of years, they owe their success to their adaptability, omnivorous diet, and rapid reproductive rate. Opossums are more or less arboreal, nocturnal animals, with long noses, naked ears, prehensile tails, and opposable hind toes tipped with flat pads. They eat small animals, eggs, insects, and fruit. The common, or Virginia, opossum, Didelphis marsupialis, ranges from Argentina to the N United States; it is found mostly in wooded areas and is common in the SE United States. The common opossum resembles a large rat, with a white face and long, coarse fur of mixed white-tipped and black-tipped hairs. It spends time both in trees and on the ground and makes nests of leaves, usually in holes in trees or attics, basements and crawl spaces. When frightened it goes into a state of collapse; this involuntary “playing possum” sometimes saves it from predators, who lose interest in an apparently dead animal. The female usually has the typical marsupial pouch, although it is absent in some of the South American species. The 6 to 18 young are born after a gestation of 12 days and weigh 1/15 oz. (1.9 grams); they crawl through the mother's fur to the pouch where they are carried and nursed for three months. After emerging, they ride on the mother's back, clinging to her fur or tail with their own tails.

 


 

 

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